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Beyond the Song: the Journeys sing “Looking More Like Your Father”

Written by Staff on August 21, 2019 – 9:34 am -

Beyond the Song: the Journeys sing "Looking More Like Your Father."

Beyond the Song: the Journeys sing “Looking More Like Your Father.”

By Jantina de Haan-Baksteen

Once again, I had the pleasure of doing an interview for a Beyond the Song article, and this time I talked with Donna Journey of the Journeys.

They recently released a video of the song ‘Looking More Like Your Father.” That production made me want to get them for this edition of Beyond the Song.

Jantina: Please share a short introduction of your singing Career as The Journeys.

Donna Journey: The Journeys started their ministry in 2012, after realizing that (our) son Ben, who had been diagnosed with Autism at the early age of 2 had taught himself to play guitar. (I) had sung all my life with my family and other groups but decided it was time to come off the road and care for Ben. I began to notice Ben’s love for music and encouraged him to explore that love.

In 2011, Ben taught himself, without any lessons, to play the guitar. A friend of the family’s helped Ben with timing. In 2012, they recorded their first CD and started accepting appointments to sing and play in local churches.

Beyond the Song: the Journeys sing "Looking More Like Your Father."Jantina:What year did you start as a duet?

Donna: We started to become a duet in 2012, myself together with Ben who takes the instrumental part of the ministry, playing the gitar or the piano.

Jantina: Can you share your testimony?

Donna:When Ben was diagnosed with Autism in 1996, we felt like our world was torn apart. We couldn’t even begin to know how God would use this test as a testimony for our family. Doctors told us that Ben would not be able to communicate with us or function socially in society. But God had another plan! 

And now we are traveling in 14 different states and sharing hope with families with special needs children.

We think it is safe to say that God is in control.

Ben now plays keyboard, piano, drums, bass guitar, acoustic guitar and is leaning banjo. Ben has played on all three of our albums.

Jantiy: Tell us about the latest release to radio?

Donna: We just got finished making a video with our current release to Radio, “Looking More Like Your Father,” written by Carolyn Connor.

Beyond the Song: the Journeys sing "Looking More Like Your Father."Jantina: What is the message of this song?

Donna: This song has been a blessing to so many people. It talks about looking like your earthly Father, but then states how we all are to strive to look like our Heavenly Father every day. This song is on the SGNScoops Country Gospel and Southern Gospel Chart, Magazine charts.

Jantina: What is the horizon for the Journeys?

Donna: We are looking forward to going back in the studio within the next year to record our fourth project with Chapel Valley Recording, and looking forward to sharing our ministry in many other states next year.

Jantina:Where can they find you on the web?

Donna: They can find us on the web at www.thejourneysgospel.net 

You can also purchase our music on all major media markets.

Thank you to the journeys for sharing the song with us. We hope you travel safely on your journey.

We hope all our readers enjoy the following song, by the Journeys, entitled, “Looking More Like Your Father.”

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SGNScoops magazine welcomes Angela Parker and her look at Autism

Written by Staff on September 17, 2018 – 6:55 am -

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker and her son, Christian

Angela Parker and her son, ChristianSGNSCOOPS magazine welcomes Angela Parker to the team of writers. Angela Parker is a life-long singer and sings with her mother’s group, Mercy Rain. She resides in Lexington, SC. She’s been happily married to her husband Jack for nearly 4 years and they have five children.

 

Faces of Autism by Angela Parker

People often ask me, “What is Autism to you?”

Well, I’d have to say that Autism, to me, is a lot of different things. It’s been many things to me over the last 18 years. It has been tantrums, late nights, stimming (short for self-stimulatory behavior, behaviors that may include hand- flapping, rocking, spinning, or repetition of words and phrases), schedules, worried days, Individualized Education Program (IEP) Meetings, therapy sessions, repetition, behaviors, among many other things.

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker's niece, Kylie

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker’s niece, Kylie

However, it has also been big smiles, goofy jokes, huge laughs, unexpected hugs, reaching goals that we thought were unattainable, unimaginable pride and more love than any mother could ever hold in her heart. I wouldn’t trade any of it for the world.

I never knew that my whole world would be surrounded by the most awesome kids, including my own son, niece and nephew.

I’ve been blessed to not only have a son with Autism, but also a niece and nephew. I believe that God only gives His most precious gifts to those He trusts the most. I keep asking God if He’s sure He trusts me so much.

The challenges began 18 years ago in January and haven’t stopped, but God has seen us through every step of the way. One of our latest struggles, for instance, was Algebra 1. Without it, my son, Christian, couldn’t graduate.

I worked as hard as I could with my son to get him through Algebra 1 so he could graduate, and now he’ll be graduating in December. I couldn’t be more pleased. This will be the most exciting moment of my life. Words can’t describe it.

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker's nephew, Zach

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker’s nephew, Zach

My niece, Kylie, and nephew, Zach, also have an amazing mom that is an awesome Autism advocate for them. I love her for that. They have such a supporting mom. Not all Autism Spectral Disorder (ASD) kids have that luxury, unfortunately.

Two years ago I was blessed again to be able to start working with Developmentally Delayed children at a place called Early Autism Project. God blessed me with the ability to learn quickly on the job. Before I knew it, I was a Behavior Therapist working with some of the most amazing kids ever. The kids and the families loved having us there because they knew we were there to help.

So, when someone says “What is Autism?” I have to ask them if they mean scientifically or personally. Because the meanings are so different for me and a lot of other Autism caregivers.

By Angela Parker, first posted on SGNScoops website in April 2018.

More about Angela Parker:

Angela ParkerAngela’a husband, Jack,  travels with Mercy Rain whenever he can and helps out where possible. He supports Mercy Rain continuously. Since Angela has recently been diagnosed with Lupus, Jack has done everything he can to take care of her.

They have five (5) children. Christian is 18 and will be graduating in the spring of 2019. He is looking forward to college soon after that. His main hobby is skateboarding. Brennah is 17 and will be graduating in the spring of 2019 as well. She is in her second year of cosmetology and plans to have her license upon graduation. She currently works at Blush Nails and Spa in Red Bank, S.C. and is saving up for her first car. Noah is 14 and is entering his freshman year of high school. He takes Honors classes and is in the Marching Band. He’s proficient on the trumpet but has the ability to play many other brass instruments.  McKenzie is 19 and graduated in spring of 2017 after which she also received her cosmetology license. She currently works at Regis Hair Salon in Columbiana Mall in Columbia, SC. Brett is 14 and is also entering his freshman year in high school. He is on the Golf Team with his school and enjoys riding his dirt bike.

Angela is also the daughter of LaVerne and Noah Sanders. She attributes a lot of her successes to her parents. She feels that they have supported her through every hardship she’s been through in her life.

Mercy Rain

Mercy Rain

Angela is no stranger to Southern Gospel Music. She started singing at the age of five. She remembers singing on the stage in church at the age of seven. She loved gospel music so much that she would beg to go to her mom’s group practices. She begged to travel on the road with those groups. She just couldn’t get enough. She was raised on Southern Gospel and continues to follow that path to this day.

She actively advocates for Autism Awareness. She feels education for all involved is the key to their success. She worked with Autistic children providing ABA Therapy up until her current illness forced her to have to quit. She has seen ABA Therapy work, and there aren’t enough therapists for the amount of kids that need help.

She speaks out against Domestic Violence having been a victim of abuse for many years herself. You can never understand personal torment until you endure domestic violence for as long as she has. She felt the mental and verbal abuse was worse than the physical. Her constant battle today is healing from the mental scars that are left over after the physical and verbal abuse. Her personal testimony will help others see how God can deliver you from abuse and help you heal after.

When she had to quit her job as a Behavior Therapist because of her health, she had no idea what she could do next. So this new writing endeavor is going to be fun for her. She wrote poetry in high school and even had one published in an anthology. She is very excited about writing for SGN Scoops and loves all of the SGN Scoops family. She loves the Lord with all her heart and has been blessed with awesome talent and love for others. You will be blessed by her talent and great spirit!

Thanks Angela, for joining the SGNScoops team!

Be sure to read Angela’s first artist feature in the September issue of SGNScoops magazine as she talks to the Gibbs Family.

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Autism Awareness Month: Faces of Autism

Written by Staff on April 20, 2018 – 8:40 am -

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker and her son, Christian

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker and her son, Christian

What Is Autism? 

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability of great complexity; signs appear during early childhood typically and affect a person’s ability to communicate, and interact with others. ASD is defined by a certain set of behaviors and is a “spectrum condition” that affects individuals differently and to varying degrees. There is no known single cause of autism, but increased awareness and early diagnosis/intervention and access to appropriate services/supports lead to significantly improved outcomes. Some of the behaviors associated with autism include delayed learning of language; difficulty making eye contact or holding a conversation; difficulty with executive functioning, which relates to reasoning and planning; narrow, intense interests; poor motor skills’ and sensory sensitivities. Again, a person on the spectrum might follow many of these behaviors or just a few, or many others besides. The diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder is applied based on analysis of all behaviors and their severity.

In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued their ADDM autism prevalence report. The report concluded that the prevalence of autism had risen to 1 in every 68 births in the United States – nearly twice as great as the 2004 rate of 1 in 125 – and almost 1 in 54 boys. The spotlight shining on autism as a result has opened opportunities for the nation to consider how to serve families facing a lifetime of supports for their children. In June 2014, researchers estimated the lifetime cost of caring for a child with autism is as great as $2.4 million. The Autism Society estimates that the United States is facing almost $90 billion annually in costs for autism. (http://www.autism-society.org/what-is/, April 20, 2018.)

Faces of Autism by Angela Parker

People often ask me, “What is Autism to you?”

Well, I’d have to say that Autism, to me, is a lot of different things. It’s been many things to me over the last 18 years. It has been tantrums, late nights, stimming (short for self-stimulatory behavior, behaviors that may include hand- flapping, rocking, spinning, or repetition of words and phrases), schedules, worried days, Individualized Education Program (IEP) Meetings, therapy sessions, repetition, behaviors, among many other things.

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker's niece, Kylie

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker’s niece, Kylie

However, it has also been big smiles, goofy jokes, huge laughs, unexpected hugs, reaching goals that we thought were unattainable, unimaginable pride and more love than any mother could ever hold in her heart. I wouldn’t trade any of it for the world.

I never knew that my whole world would be surrounded by the most awesome kids, including my own son, niece and nephew.

I’ve been blessed to not only have a son with Autism, but also a niece and nephew. I believe that God only gives His most precious gifts to those He trusts the most. I keep asking God if He’s sure He trusts me so much.

The challenges began 18 years ago in January and haven’t stopped, but God has seen us through every step of the way. One of our latest struggles, for instance, was Algebra 1. Without it, my son, Christian, couldn’t graduate.

I worked as hard as I could with my son to get him through Algebra 1 so he could graduate, and now he’ll be graduating in December. I couldn’t be more pleased. This will be the most exciting moment of my life. Words can’t describe it.

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker's nephew, Zach

Autism Awareness Month: writer Angela Parker’s nephew, Zach

My niece, Kylie, and nephew, Zach, also have an amazing mom that is an awesome Autism advocate for them. I love her for that. They have such a supporting mom. Not all Autism Spectral Disorder (ASD) kids have that luxury, unfortunately.

Two years ago I was blessed again to be able to start working with Developmentally Delayed children at a place called Early Autism Project. God blessed me with the ability to learn quickly on the job. Before I knew it, I was a Behavior Therapist working with some of the most amazing kids ever. The kids and the families loved having us there because they knew we were there to help.

So, when someone says “What is Autism?” I have to ask them if they mean scientifically or personally. Because the meanings are so different for me and a lot of other Autism caregivers.

 

By Angela Parker, special to SGNScoops website.

 

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SGNScoops’ Fast Five with The Walkers

Written by Staff on October 5, 2015 – 10:49 am -

The Walkers

The Walkers

Welcome to addition of SGNScoops’ Fast Five! Today we talk to Christian Country/Southern Gospel group, The Walkers.  This mixed group from Florida has seen some real challenges in their lives. They have come through with a stronger faith in Christ and a greater determination to use their music to bring others closer to Jesus.

We hope you like this look at a mixed group with an unique sound. Be sure to visit their website and hear their music. You may hear a tinge of The Freemans and perhaps The Hinsons. Enjoy getting to know The Walkers!

SGN: Tell us about your group.

Billy: We did our first official date as a full time group on November 16, 1991. We were in Dothan, AL, that night. That group consisted of Billy Walker Jr. (me), my mom Geneva Walker, my dad Billy Walker, Sr. and my sister Gail Walker. Although that was our first official date, we had sung the previous few years just around our local area. Mom and Dad had invited groups to various locations down through the years. In the early ’70’s, they brought in a lot of groups to Perry, FL, most notably The Goodmans, The Hinsons and other well-known groups. My sister sang on all the concert programs that featured a who’s who of Gospel Music at the time. She recorded her first two solo albums with The Goodmans and Rusty and Sam wrote the backliners for her. She sang at the church where they (The Goodmans) pastored and my mom still has the check they gave her.

A couple of years after our start as a full time group, we faced the first real test of our resolve on January 1, 1994. We were all overcome with carbon monoxide poisoning and my father died. All of the members were all affected by the poison but fortunately three of us survived. There were many people who felt like we should stay home after that night but we only missed one weekend and carried on. If we had missed more time, we probably would have never gone back out.

In May 2003, I married the most beautiful girl in the world. As a matter of fact, she still the most beautiful woman I know. Marrying Angela Walker (nee’ Martin) changed the dynamics of the ministry as she started helping run the ministry office, taking charge of the merchandise table, and then as we moved more into the technological arena, running a full multi-media presentation during our concerts.

The Walkers2On March 11, 2008, Billy Walker, III, was born. He is known as Tripp, short for triple. His birth also changed the dynamics of the ministry. Having a little baby and traveling all over the United States and Canada has its challenges. He loved every bit of it. However, just three days before his third birthday on March 8, 2011, he was diagnosed was autism. Angela had suspicions in the summer of ’10, and had already started making plans and preparations for how we were going to handle this life changing situation. We enrolled him into preschool where he would receive speech, music and occupational therapy. We also hired private speech and occupational therapists to work with him one on one. Since the initial diagnosis, Tripp has also been diagnosed with childhood apraxia of speech, which affects his ability to speak effectively. Today he is seven-and-a-half-years-old and does not speak in sentences. He is very verbal, is able to talk and is a great communicator, even though he doesn’t speak in a language that you or I would understand.

These events started The Walkers down a very different path. Up until the end of 2010 we had been on the road for 275 days a year for the past 15 years. Also, Angela and Tripp traveled full time as well. With the challenges that Tripp faced and the measures that we had to take as a family to help intervene in Tripp’s diagnosis, Angela and Tripp no longer traveled full time. We were no longer traveling as a family ministry. After a while the separation became too much for all of us. We drastically changed how we toured.

Instead of spending days away from home in regions far from our home base in Perry(Tallahassee), FL we decided to spend three weekends a month traveling within a 250 to 300 mile radius of home. We take one long weekend, Friday through Sunday nights every month, traveling as far as Texas or Illinois, Virginia, etc. We take two weeks in the fall and two weeks in the spring that we go out and we do our national tour where we cover most of the United States, and the Maritimes of Canada in the summer time when school is not in session.

In June of 2011, we brought a young man, Billy “Benji” Roach II, into the group. With his name also being Billy, we gave him the nickname Benji. He is a great young man and we are proud to have him with us. It is not easy to come into a family and blend in, but he has done a great job of it and he has been with us now so long it is just like he is family. He is from the Daytona area but now lives in Perry.

Today these are the members of The Walkers: Billy Walker, Jr.: I sing, play guitar on a few songs and drums on a few and I also run sound. Mom Geneva, plays the keyboards and writes most of the songs we sing. Gail, sister, sings and plays bass guitar on a few songs. Benji sings and sets the stage lighting when we use it. Angela runs the multi-media when she is able to travel and Tripp just runs the entire operation.

The Walkers 3We have been blessed to have three top 40 songs on the Power Source Christian Country chart with our first two songs going into the Top 10. Our latest “By A Roman Soldier’s Hand,” is at  number 24 for September and climbing. We were nominated for Group of the Year for the Inspirational Country Music Association back in 2013.

While our best radio success has come in the Christian Country genre, we are probably more Southern Gospel than anything. However, our music is a very high energy with the blend of Southern Gospel, Christian Country and Contemporary. This is a style unique specifically to us. We have never tried to emulate or be anyone other than ourselves.

While we may be a relatively new name to the Gospel music world, we are not a new group. We have been around and we have been there and done that in the world of traveling and singing. We look forward to getting to know more people within the industry and the fans that support Gospel music.

SGN: What is your favorite vacation spot?

Billy: Vacation? What is that? I tell people that I am the hardest working, broke person you’ll ever meet. We don’t get too many opportunities to get away but Angela and I love to go on cruises. It has been way too long since we have been on one and I am really getting the fever. Another place that we like to go is to Saint George Island in Florida. It isn’t too far away and if we just want to get away for the day or a short day-night trip it’s easy to get there and back.

Mom and Gail like to just stay home and relax on their couch with their tv and Benji goes home to the Daytona area. He likes the beach there for some reason.

SGN: How can we purchase your music? How can we book The Walkers?

Billy: Our latest album Twenty is available at our concerts, iTunes, Amazon and just about any other dot com. You can order it off of our website, www.thewalkersonline.com or you can call us at 850.672.9155.

You can schedule The Walkers by again, calling us at 850.672.9155. You can e-mail me, Billy, at billy@thewalkersonline.com. Pretty simple.

SGN: While traveling, what is The Walkers favorite restaurant?

The Walkers4Billy: We LOVE a good buffet with good fried chicken. I tell people the words I live by and probably will die by is, “If it ain’t fried, it shouldn’t have died.” Angela and I love Mexican and Chinese food. Mom and Gail can take it or leave it, but she and I love it! Benji just loves food. So Golden Corral or Ryan’s is always a hit with our crew.

SGN: What are some future goals of the group?

Billy: We have had a lot of great things happen to us in the past. But, we are not content to stay there. I am never satisfied with where we are at in our ministry. I believe strongly in two things: If you aren’t growing then your dying, and I hate the status quo. The other is we should always strive for excellence in what we do. We serve the King of Kings, an excellent God and I believe He not only deserves our best but He expects our best.

Obviously the biggest goal is to continue to make an impact on the world for Christ. We have been blessed to see many, many people saved throughout these 23 plus years. We want to be a voice in the church and in the world that stands strong for what is right and represent Christ with the unashamed and unapologetic message that He is soon coming, we must be ready and we must take the message to everyone we can.

I believe one of the biggest industry goals of ours is to raise awareness of who we are and what we have to offer churches and promoters. Another is to continue to strive for greater radio airplay and to break into the Southern Gospel market more effectively.

We always strive to have a first class sound system and we are constantly improving on it and continuing to learn the nuances that make a good sound.

1461731_601928889873659_387123717_nAnother goal is to continue to polish what we do on stage. We are a track-based group but Mom plays keyboard on nearly everything we sing. I play guitar on a few things and we also do a couple of songs live with Mom on keys, Gail on bass and me on drums. We want to continue to build our stage lighting. We are one of the few groups in our field that use lights. We do not use them to put on a show but rather to create an atmosphere more conducive for worship. So many churches have florescent lighting and we just try to dim as much of that as we can to create that atmosphere.

We want to continue to progress with our multi-media. As most of the songs we sing are original, you are not going to be as familiar with them. This helps you follow along as we are singing and we even have different videos that go along with songs during this.

We just want to strive to be the best we can be. Find us at: www.thewalkersonline.comwww.facebook.com/walkerministries and www.twitter.com/walkers music .

 

SGEN scoops is pleased to highlight the ministry of The Walkers today. Please visit their website and their Facebook page to find out more about this outstanding group.

 

SGNScoops is pleased to highlight the ministry of The Walkers today. Please visit their website and their Facebook page to find out more about this outstanding group.

Be sure to keep watch on SGNScoops’ Facebook page and SGNScoops website for more artist features and all the latest news!

 

 

 

 


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A New Normal

Written by Scoops Staff on April 8, 2010 – 1:32 pm -

One Mom’s Experience with Sensory Integration Dysfunction
By Jennifer Shaw

April is National Autism Awareness Month.  Sensory Integration Dysfunction is closely associated with autism in that many autistic children have some form of SID.  To date, the medical community is unclear of the exact connection.  SID is also often misdiagnosed as ADD or ADHD.  The following is an editorial from singer/speaker Jennifer Shaw:

I was the mother of two beautiful girls and was thrilled to add a son to our family.  After a difficult and dangerous pregnancy, we were especially thankful that our baby boy, who we named Toby, was born healthy.  He seemed to be a very unhappy baby compared to our girls, but we hoped he would grow out of it.

The first indication that something was out of the ordinary was when we could not get him to eat any food.  I nursed him without a problem, but when we introduced baby foods, it was a daily struggle that we lost.  We also noticed that he never babbled or made any sounds and he rarely smiled.  Eventually it was clear that he was very speech-delayed, but because he had suffered from repeat ear infections which caused clinical deafness during his first year, we attributed a lot of his mood to pain and hoped that when his hearing improved, his speech would come along.  After surgery on his ears, his hearing did get better and his infections went away, but he still did not make any sounds.

During Toby’s second year, my father was dying of ALS and that took much of our emotional energy.  But Toby’s behavior was becoming more and more extreme.  He wouldn’t touch anything or play, he did not want to be touched, and he was terrified of being messy or being anywhere near things like grass or sand.  A drop of water on his clothing would make him scream.  It became really frightening and we did not know how to help him. 

When Toby turned two, we started him at a therapy school for speech delay.  There was an occupational therapist on staff and she was the first to diagnose Toby with Sensory Integration Dysfunction (also known as Sensory Processing Disorder).  Toby’s brain was not interpreting sensory input correctly. People with this disorder can suffer in a variety of ways, but in Toby’s case, he was extremely hyper-sensitive to touch of any kind.  Food in his mouth, clothes on his skin, crumbs on his hands were all completely intolerable to him — he thought they were actually hurting him.

Toby began play-based occupational therapy, speech therapy, some physical therapy (because he didn’t touch things or play and had poor balance, his muscles were very weak), and food therapy. Within two months my son who had previously uttered no sounds said, “I love you, Mom.”  Within a year, Toby’s progress was nothing short of miraculous.  He is now five and was discharged from all private therapies a year ago.  He never had to have any medications or drug therapies.  Although he still has some minor sensory issues, he has learned to cope with those challenges and he is now considered a typical child.

I am a songwriter and recording artist, not a doctor or therapist, but we learned a lot of things in our journey with SID that I share with people who suspect this condition in their own children. There is so much hope if you know where to look, and although Toby’s outcome is not typical, there is help for every child with this diagnosis. So here’s my advice:

Do not ignore the signs even if you don’t know what they mean.  This is by no means a comprehensive list, but some of the symptoms of SID are speech delay, poor coordination, poor balance, avoiding touch or seeking touch in extreme ways (running into walls or falling down on purpose, running into people), extremely picky eating or extremely messy eating, irritability or a “difficult” personality.  SID is often misdiagnosed, especially in older children, as ADD or ADHD.

Do not wait, even when your pediatrician tells you to. After everything we went through with Toby, my pediatrician (whom I love and respect) told me that she gave me the wrong advice by advising me to wait for Toby to catch up.  This is what most doctors are taught, and while it is probably true for many problems, SID is not one of them.  Treatment is so much more effective before the age of three that you cannot afford to waste time.  If you suspect something, trust your instincts and get your child tested by an occupational therapist. If they say there’s nothing to worry about, fine, but if not, you have not wasted valuable time that your child needs for therapy.

Get educated. Find out all you can and do everything in your power to help your child on a daily basis at home.  We used to laugh about “our life as therapy” as we tried to integrate all Toby’s therapies into everything we did.  An excellent book on this topic is The Out of Sync Child by Carol Stock Kranowitz.

Get help. There is a federal program for developmentally-delayed children from age 0-3 available in every state.  It goes by many different names – ours was called “Help Me Grow”.  They will do testing and help get your child into therapy programs, most of which are free if you qualify. Toby’s therapy program literally changed his life and ours.  You can call the special needs department at your local school district and they should be able to tell you who operates the program in your area.  After the age of three, help is available through your local school district. Take advantage of any therapy coverage on your insurance plan.  Talk to your therapists about what you can do at home, watch the therapy whenever possible, and ask a lot of questions.  We were able to overcome a lot of Toby’s food issues only because we learned techniques from our therapists.

Re-define baby steps. This is not a quick fix.  For example, Toby was literally afraid of food. We were not usually able to get him to stay in the same room with us while we ate.  And sitting down and eating a meal was out of the question.  So first, we worked on getting him to be with us in the room at meal times, eventually coaxed him to sit at the table, then got him to allow us to put food on the plate, then he learned to touch the food with a fork, then he touched it to his tongue but didn’t eat it, etc.  It was a long, frustrating process, but my son eats a healthy diet now and the simplicity of a family meal has become a true blessing in our lives.

Get support. SID can be very lonely and frightening.  Our church was an amazing support to us and truly held us together at times.  I met so many parents of special needs children at the school and it helped us realize we weren’t alone.  They were also a wonderful resource of ideas as we all talked about what was working or not working for our children.

Don’t give up. SID can be overwhelming and confusing.  It can be hard to navigate the system.  Every therapy will not work for every child and you will need to be careful and wise about your choices.  Take comfort in knowing that there is help and things can improve.  You are your child’s best advocate.

SID makes family life difficult, and it can be very hard to watch your child struggle.  But there is hope and help, making positive results very possible.  With persistence, we can help our children cope with their world and enjoy their lives, as we enjoy the blessing that they are in ours.

###

For more information on Jennifer Shaw, visit www.JenniferShaw.com.

Jennifer’s first radio single from her new CD, LOVE BROKE THROUGH, has already topped the national worship charts. Jennifer has been interviewed on several national television shows as well as radio stations across the country.
Schedule an interview with Jennifer today!

Call toll free 888-253-3622
Gina@AdamsPRGroup.com

We have a few review and giveaway copies of her new CD still available!


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